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COLLEGE 





AEW3 



Vol. 4. No. 14. 



WELLESLEY, MASS., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 25, 1904. 



Price, 5 Cents 



THE INSTALLATION OF PHI 
BETA KAPPA. 

The installation of the Phi Beta Kappa 
Society at Wellesley on the seventeenth of 
January was a memorable ceremony, and 
the foundation meeting gave to the college 
at large an opportunity to witness an event 
of great significance and future promise to 
Wellesley College. Previous to this, the 
Eta Chapter of Massachusetts was formal- 
ly installed by Dr. Edwin P. Giosvenor of 
Amherst, after which President Hazard 
was welcomed as an honorary member. 
Offi^ors were elec^f-' as loIIosss; E •;-. ident r 
Dr. Katharine M. Edwards; Vice-Presi- 
dent, Dr. Margaret P. Sherwood; Sec:e- 
tary. Dr. Laura E. Lockwood; Treasurer, 
Mr. Clarence G. Hamilton. The initiation 
followed of five members of the class of 

1905- 

Dr. Edwards, who received her key from 
Cornell, presided as chairman. The exer- 
cises opened at half-past four with the 
singing by the choir of the anthem ' ' Oh 
Send out Thy Light. " Dr. Mackenzie, Pres- 
ident Emeritus of the Board of Trustees, a 
member of Phi Beta Kappa, offered 
a short prayer, and then followed the sing- 
ing of the "Phi Beta Kappa" h)rmn by 
the entire audience. In her speech of in- 
troduction following, Professor Edwards 
explained that it was the custom to have 
present at the installation of a, new chapter 
either the President of the Senate or some 
distinguished member whom he chose as 
his representative. To Wellesley fell the 
honor of having Dr. Grosvenor of Am- 
herst, a member of the Beta Chapter 
of Massachusetts, who began his address 
by alluding to the strong bond of fellow- 
ship among all college people, no matter 
how widely separated their Alma Maters. 
He opened the history of Phi Beta Kappa 
by paying a short but eloquent tribute to 
William and Mary College of Virginia, 
where the society was born one hundred 
and twenty-eight years ago. The oldest 
college in America, it is notable also for 
its progressive spi it, It vts the first 



college to peimit the elective system, the 
first to become a university, to institute 
modern languages into its curriculum, to 
support the honor system, and to shake 
free from religious supervision. The old 
college is situated in the historic town of 
Williamsburg, and here, on December fifth, 
1776, a elate which is engraved on every 
Phi Beta Kappa key, five of the college 
students met and founded the Phi Beta 
Kappa Society in the very hall where .Pat- 
rick Henry made his famous speech. The 
object of the society was self development; 
its members were to be distinguished biy 
their courtes3', their culture and attain- 
ments. They banded together under the 
-^ '.nic of- ;he- Alpha Chapte. of- Phi Beia 
Kappa in Virginia. Among the members 
were Bushrod Washington and the first 
Chief Justice of the United States, John 
Marshall. 

Elisha Parmale, whom Edward Everett 
Hale has called the St. Paul of Phi Beta 
Kappa, came to William and Mary from 
Yale. He was invited to join the new 
society, and upon leaving, asked permis- 
sion to start new chapters in Harvard and 
Yale. It was given, and 178 1 marks the 
date of Phi Beta Kappa's introduction into 
Massachusetts. 

At the entrance of Benedict Arnold into 
Williamsburg, the Virginia Chapter was 
suspended until 1849, an d during this time 
Harvard was its careful guardian. For 
manjr years the Phi Beta Kappa Society 
was the only one which could pretend to 
be a patron of literature and philosophy. 
In the meantime the chapters multiplied. 
Dartmouth obtained a charter in 1787, 
and Trinity, Wesleyan, Vermont and 
many others followed in due time. At 
the revival of the Alpha Chapter of Vir- 
ginia there was present the last member 
to be initiated before the dissolution of the 
society. The chapter flourished for a 
time, and again was disbanded, to be re- 
vived eleven years ago, but the long gap 
was bridged by the presence of Benjamin 
Saunders Ewell, who was initiated at the 
time of the second organization in 1849. 

Phi Beta Kappa had long before grown 
from a secret society "into the larger 



ambition of a union of scholars." The 
motto, the grip and other secrets of the 
society were made public. All this time 
Phi Beta Kappa had increased in chapters, 
and by 1881 there were twenty-three un- 
connected chapters. A movement was 
started to unite the chapters, which re- 
sulted in a national council being held in 
1883. Six years ago Vassar College 
petitioned for a charter, and after long dis- 
cussion as to whether the ideals of Phi Beta 
Kappa would be maintained in women's 
colleges, the charter was granted, with, 
however, not one vote to spare! 

Charters to Phi Beta Kappa are granted 
with great care by the Senate. Not every 
college with a rich endui.mein and a long 
faculty list has been able to procure the 
much-valued honor — and, on the other 
hand, some colleges which have barely a na- 
tional reputation, yet which have set for 
themselves a high ideal of scholarship have 
been considered to confer honor upon the 
splendid old organization. Four points de- 
termine the chances of a college for re- 
ceiving the Phi Beta Kappa: the ability of 
its Faculty, the nature of its curriculum, 
the scholarship of its students, and its 
general reputation. As to the qualifica- 
tions of the individuals who receive- the 
key — those must be talent, ability to do 
hard work, or both. 

Professor Grosvenor concluded by say- 
ing tha.t the charter was granted to Welles- 
ley by a unanimous vote. 

After Professor Grosvenor's address, 
Miss Hazard, who is the first honorary 
member of the Eta Chapter of Massachu- 
setts, read a poem, full of grace and fancy, 
written by her for this occasion, entitled 
"The Illuminators." The services were 
concluded by the singing of Alma Mater by 
the audience and a benediction by Dr. 
Mackenzie. 

The present and charter members of the 
Wellesley Chapter are Miss Hazard, Miss 
Edwards, Miss Sherwood, Miss Lockwood, 
Miss Burnham, Mr. Hamilton and Dr. Ban- 
croft of the Faculty; and Clara Bruce, Ellen 
Manchester, Isabelle Stone, Louise Sylves- 
ter and Ethel Waxham, all from the class of 
1905. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



Coll ege IR ews, 

Pri«» »r N. A. Linosev 4 Co.. Boston. 

Published weekly. Subscription price, 75 cents a 
year to resident subscribers ; S1.00 per year to non- 
resident subscribers. 

All advertising communications should be sent to 
Miss C. W. Rogers, Wellesley Inn, Wellesley. 

All business correspondence should be addressed to 
HELEN R. NORTON, Business Manager College 
News. 

All subscriptions should be sent to Elizabeth 
Gamp. 



Editor-in-Chief, Mary Jessie Gidley, 1906 

Associate Editor, Sadie M. Samuel, 1906 

Literart Editors, 

Winifred Hawkridge, 1906 Mary Lee Cadwell, 1906 

Marie Warren, 1907 

Alumna Editor, Roxana H. Vivian, 1894 

Managing Editors, 

Helen R, Norton, 1905 Elizabeth Camp, 1905 

J. Gertrude Francis, 1906 



"Entered as second class matter, November 12, 
1903, at the post office at Wellesley, Mass., under 
the Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. 



The "Questionnaire," recently issued by 
the New York Wellesley Club to all its 
members, for the purpose of obtaining a 
consensus of opinion on the desirability of 
college education for girls, is interesting 
even from an undergraduate point of view. 
The questions cover the widest possible 
range, challenging every phase of college 
life to justify itself; and many Wellesley 
graduates who are not members of the 
New York Club will doubtless be interested 
to read the combined answers, if they are 
to be published. Yet to a college girl it 
would seem that the opinion thus gained 
must be of limited use to those who are 
v. '. . .. lering the ' higher education," inas- 
much as only one college is in question. 
Or perhaps in the minds of the New York 
alummc it is a case of "aut Wellesley, aut 
nihil. " 

It is noticeable as one reads the list, 
that many of the questions are not those 
that we should ask ourselves, were we 
trying to prove that college, as it is, is 
worth while for us. On the other hand, 
many of us remember that the purposes 
for which we first came to college are not 
always the same as those with which we 
finish our course. College has not, per- 
haps, done for us what we hoped it would; 
but then, perhaps too, we are glad now that 
it has not, in the recognition of the higher 
services that it has rendered. More than 
this, it seems evident that at least the 
younger members of the Alumna?, as well 
as ourselves, would find it very hard to say 
just what college life has done for them 
before having passed through the expe- 
riences for which college is presumably a 



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impossible to reach any very definite 
decision by statistics of this kind, for 
different people demand vastly different 
things of an)' college; yet if this curious 
"Questionnaire" proves once more that 
Wellesley has given the greatest possible 
good to the greatest possible number, it 
will have proved somewhat useful, as an 
assurance to those who may still be in 
doubt. 

President Hazard tells us that Wellesley 
is now the largest college for women in the 
United States. In many respects it is 
doubtless one of the best; and if we can 
make it any better by submitting both it 
and ourselves to an occasional rigorous 
mid-year examination like the one made 
out by the New York Wellesley Club, the 
attempt may be worth while. But an ex- 
amination is by no means always the best 
test of development and attainment. 



NOTICE. 

All copy for College News should be 
in the editors' hands by Friday noon of 
each week. Address general correspond- 
ence to Jessie Gidley, Eliot; Alumna; notes 
to Miss Vivian, College Hall; College notes 
to Sadie Samuel, Freeman; Athletic, 
Literary and Society notes to Winifred 
Hawkridge, Stone; Free Press to Mary Lee 
Cadwell, Wood; Parliament of Fools to 
Marie Warren, Fiske. 



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COLLEGE NEWS 



COLLEGE CALENDAR. 

January 24, 3.20 P.M., in Lecture Room 2, lecture by Miss Alice 
Bacon before the History Department. Subject, "Rela- 
tion between Japan and Corea. 

January 25, 7.30 P.M., mid-week prayer meeting of the Chris- 
tian Association. 

January 29, n A.M., services in Houghton Memorial chapel, 
sermon by Rev Charles Carter of Lexington. 
7 P.M., vesper service. 

Ja-nuary 30, 7.30 P.M., in College Hall Chapel, lecture by Miss 
Harriet A. Boyd. Subject, " Recent Excavations in Crete. " 

COLLEGE NOTES. 



The long-distance telephone was kept unusually busy all 
day Monday, January 16, conveying invitations to the Ice 
Carnival, which was hastily decided upon for that evening. 
The night was a perfect one, and in spite of the short notice 
many out-of-town guests were present. The ice was in excel- 
lent condition. Two high-piled fires filled the air with a ruddv 
glow, and many Japanese lanterns nickered in and out among 
the throng, borne on the ends of hockey sticks by the girls. A 
collation of hot coffee and sandwiches was served in the Barn. 

On Monday evening, January 30th, Miss Harriet A. Boyd of 
Smith College will give an illustrated lecture in College Hall 
Chapel on " Recent Excavations in Crete. " 

Miss Boyd has had a remarkable career in Greece. She was a 
student at the American Classical School in Athens in 1S96-7 
when the war between Greece and Turkey broke out. She left 
her studies and for several months went with the Greek army 
as a nurse. For these services she was decorated by the king 
and queen. The following year she resumed her studies and 
in 1899-1900 held the Agnes Hoppin fellowship for women in 
the school. In 1901 she conducted in person excavations in 
Crete at Gournia and has won for herself distinguished honor 
among archaeological scholars by the discovery of a very an- 
cient town with interesting remains. Her lecture will be an 
account of her own labors in the field. All members of the 
College are cordially invited to attend. 

A business meeting of the Christian Association was held in 
College Hall Chapel, January 19. Reports were read from the 
Mission Study Committee and Correspondence Committee and 
new members were received into the Association. 

Saturday evening, January 21, the Barnswallows held a 
dance in the Barn. There was a large crowd present and every 
one had the usual merry time at Barnswallow affairs. 

At a meeting of the Alpha Kappa Chi Society held on Satur- 
day evening, January 14, in the Alpha Kappa Chi House, the 
following were received into membership: Grace E. Duncan, 
1906, Jean N. Aiken, 1907, Margaret E. Dungan, 1907, and Jean 
D. Russell, 1907. 

There was a "Freshman Frolic" given at the Barn by the 
Christian Association Monday afternoon, January 23. 

Miss Daphne Crane, 1907, visited the College last week. 
She sails for Italy from Charleston, Saturday, January 28. 

The New Year Greeting for 1905. sent out by the English 
Literature Department, was in the form of an essay bv Miss 
Shackford on the subject, " Reading for Leisure Hours in Col- 
lege." The booklet includes a list of standard works which all 
o. : us should at some time find leisure to read. 

Students who intend to teach and all others interested in 
education are invited to a meeting to be held Saturday, Janua- 
ry 28, at 3.30. P.M., in College Hall ^ Room to be announced 
later) under the auspices of the Education Committee of the 
Boston Branch of the Association of Collegiate Alumnas. 

PROGRAMME. 

1. Opportunities open to college women for professional 
training and its importance. Principal Charles S. Chapin of 
the Rhode Island Normal School, Providence. 

2. The outlook for college graduates as teachers. Dr. John 
T. Prince, Agent of the State Board of Education. 

3 Questions and general discussion. 



CORRECTION. 



By a misunderstanding on the part of the printer, the follow- 
ing photographs, which appeared in the 1905 Legenda by the 
permission of Mr. John Ryan, were attributed to Mr. Abell. 

Page 190, College Hall. 

Page 191, Stone Hall. 

Page 192, Norumbega. 

Page 195. Fiske. 

Page 196, The Oaks. 

Page 204, Walk. 

Page 239, Walk. 

Page 6 of Advertisements, East Lodge. 

Page 12 of Advertisements, Chapel. 

Last page in book, Moonlight, 



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COLLEGE NEWS 



FREE PRESS. 

The editor of the Free Press has received several inquiries 
asking the reasons for the increase in the price of board_ Not 
being able to answer these questions, she has obtained the fol- 
lowing statement from an official source: 
. The Trustees of Welleslev have felt that their first duty as 
Trustees was to administer the College so as to keep it free from 
debt The alumna; will remember the immense effort which 
was made in 1900 to pay the debt, and 1he Tiustees have felt 
that they would be disloyal to the alumna; to allow a debt once 
more to accumulate. It was proved that the College could be 
run without a deficit in iqoi and again 111 1902; but lor the ten 
years preceding this time, owing to the great stringency m 
college finances, many repairs and renewals had to be post- 
poned^ ? Thus it became absolutely imperative to put in the 
new sewage plant, new wells have had to be driven and other 
permanent improvements made. No women's college has so 
large an external plant to take care of as Wellesley . The grounds 
and roads, clearing the snow in winter from three miles 01 plank 
walk, the whole drainage system and maintenance of buildings 
make great demands upon the resources of the College, and 
their proper care is vital to its successful conduct. In the 
meantime, the cost of provisions has gone up, so that the College 
dormitories are actually far more expensive to run than they 
were five years ago. Under these conditions, and bearing m 
mind their obligation to have the business management of the 
College a success, the only alternative presented to the Trustees 
was to increase the price of board, which was obviously inade- 
quate, or, to run into debt. It is for these reasons that the ad- 
dition' to the price of board is made. 

AN IDYL BY JOSEP HINE" P RESTON PEABODY. 

Those who were in College when Miss Josephine Preston Pea- 
body was a member of the English Literature Department will 
be interested to know, that on November 15, 1904, at Ottawa, 
Canada, the Farewell State Concert, which was given to their 
Excellencies, the Count and Countess of Minto, was a choric 
idyl, the words of which were written by Miss Peabody. 
C :The idyl is entitled "Pan" and is founded on the myth, of 
which the following quotation taken from the program is a 
synopsis. 

'-■ ''Pan, god of the woods and fields, saw one day and straight- 
way loved the nymph Syrinx, who fled from him with terror, 
calling on all the rural divinities for some way of escape. The 
water nymphs alone gave ear, and changed the maiden out of 
her human form, to a cluster of reeds. And Pan, broken- 
hearted at first, turned his grief into music; for he gathered the 
reeds, bound them together, and so made the shepherd's pipe, 
which is called to this day a Syrinx, or the "Pipes of Pan." 
After the above synopsis the following explanatory note is given: 

"The text revives certain rudiments of the earliest Greek 
drama, in that it treats this myth as a little Satyr-play centered 
about a worship of nature. The chorus embodies the voices of 
the forest; spirits of trees and streams, fauns, Satyrs and echoes. 
The orchestral music fills in the action here and there; as in 
Pan's pursuit of Syrinx, the transformation of the nymph into 
a reed, and in the tentative piping of the god Pan, when — 
uncomforted by the laughter-loving fauns — he finds consolation 
in his own wild music. The meaning of the story widens at 
the close with a choral hymn which celebrates the wonder of 
man at the healing of nature, his trust that all things shall be 
turned in the end to beauty; and his praise of the benign pow- 
ers in "the world of leaves." 

The music for this idyl of Miss Peabody's was composed by 
Mr. Charles A. E. Harriss. 

LIBRARY NOTES. 



■ That the two distinguished collections of books owned by the 
College, the Plimpton Library of Italian books and manuscripts, 
and the Powell collection of specimens of North American Indian 
dialects, are by no means inaccessible to the world of scholars 
is shown by two incidents of the past week. A request has been 
received from a gentleman in Italy who is making a collection of 
Philological Journals, for permission to have a photographic 
facsimile made of the Pipe of Peace, a newspaper in the Ojib- 
way dialect. The plates will be taken in reduced size and will 
Subsequently be enlarged to the exact size of the original, in 
•Italy. 

Mr. Updike of the Merrymount Press in Boston visited the 
Plimpton Library recently. Mr. Updike is a connoisseur in 
matters relating to early printed books, and his press has 
achieved some very successful results in reproducing old types. 
It is his purpose to have a typefounder from the Merrymount 
Press come out and make copies of some of the forms of type 
in th.e Plimpton books and take accurate measurements of the 
spacing and leading on several title pages. 



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COLLEGE NEWS 



LIBRARY NOTES— Continued. 



Special provision has been made for making the contents of 
both the Plimpton and the Powell collection available to schol- 
ars. In the case of the Plimpton Library, five duplicate card 
catalogues have been provided by Mr. Plimpton to be deposited 
with the Harvard, Boston Public, New York Public, Chicago 
Public and Congressional Libraries respectively. The con- 
tents of the Powell Library are catalogued in part in the biblio- 
graphies of the native North American languages published by 
the Smithsonian Institution. 

A collection of Aldine editions from the Plimpton Library, 
augmented by the loan of three specimens from the General 
Library, is now on exhibition in the Billings Hall Library. The 
exhibition will continue through February 22. 



IN MEM0R1AM. 



WILLIAM HENRY WILLCOX, 1821-1904. 
(Extracts from a pamphlet recently published.) 

"William Henry Willcox was born in New York, in 182 1. . 
Though city bred, he came through both parents from lines of 
New England farmers extending back for nearly two hundred 
years of Puritan ancestry. . Entering New York Uni- 

versity at the age of eighteen, he graduated thence with highest 
honors in 1843 ar >d m 1846 completed his course at the Theolo- 
gical Seminary. . . . Four years after that time he began 
pastoral work with the Union Congregational Church of Kenne- 
bunk, Maine, where he was settled in 1852. A few months later 
he married Annie Goodenow of Alfred, daughter of Judge 
Daniel Goodenow of the Maine Supreme Court, who still survives. 
After five years in Kennebunk, Mr. Willcox accepted a call to the 
Bethesda Church in Reading, Mass., where he remained for 

twenty-two years His sympathetic nature won 

the confidence and love of his parishioners, many of whom after 
more than a quarter of a century, still remember him as their 
beloved pastor. 

The death of Daniel Stone of Maiden in 187S, left the aunt 
of Mrs. Willcox, Valeria Goodneow Stone, a childless widow in 
the possession of more than S2, 000, 000. Before her husband's 
death Mr. Willcox had been the adviser of both in regard to the 
disposition of the property, and had drawn their wills, and 
after that event Mrs. Stone urged and finally induced him to 
give up his pastoral work and become her confidential advisor. 
During the remaining years of her life she gave nearly half 
of her property to her relatives and friends, as her. own judg- 
ment and affection dictated. But in the distribution of over 
Si, 000, 000 to public objects she relied implicity upon the careful 
investigation and discriminating judgment of Mr. Willcox. . 

"During the twenty years allotted to him after this task was 
accomplished, much of his interest and energy were given to 
furthering, by wise counsel as a trustee, the interests of some of 
the institutions which had won his confidences, and at the time 
of his death he was a member of the Board of Trustees of An- 
dover Seminary, and Phillips Academy, chairman of the Execu- 
tive Committee of the Board of Trustees of Wellesley College, 
and President of the Congregational Educational Society. 
'We valued him for his statesmanship,' writes one, 'he was a 
wise and courageous counsellor, ' says another. But through 
his life his keenest pleasure and his greatest power and useful- 
ness came from intimate personal relations, as a pastor to his 
parishioners, as a friend and helper to young and struggling 
students, and as a sympathetic and sagacious adviser to an 
ever widening circle of friends." 



WILLIAM CLAFLIN.— 181S-1904. 

The Honorable William Claflin, former governor of Massachu- 
setts, died December 30, at his home, the "Old Elms" in New- 
ton ville. He was born in Milford, Mass., in 1S1S, entered 
Brown University in 1833, and after a varied business and po- 
litical career during which he served in Legislature and Senate, 
helped to nominate Lincoln and Grant at the National Repub- 
lican convention of '60 and '68, was chairman of the National 
committee, and for three terms governor of Massachusetts; 
he retired to private life devoting himself to many educational 
and philanthropic interests. 

Among the many honorable facts of his illustrious career, 
was his having been the first governor of any state to advocate 
officially the extension of suffrage to women, declaring himself 
in its favor in advance of his election, and recommending it in 
his inaugural message. He was for many years chairman of the 
trustees of Boston University, as well as of Wellesley College, 
and was a warm personal friend of Mrs. Alice Freeman Palmer. 
It was through the influence of Governor Claflin that Wellesley 
obtained her right to confer degrees upon graduates. 




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COLLEGE NEWS 



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THURSDAY 
Southern Batter Cakes. 

FRIDAY 
Clam Chowder (New England 
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SATURDAY 

Broiled Oysters on Toast. 

Orange Short-Cake. 



NOTICE. 

The College Equal Suffrage League will present three plays 
in Potter Hall, the New Century Building, 177 Huntington 
Avenue, on Tuesday evening, January 31, at 8 o'clock, for the 
purpose of raising money to carry on its work. The tickets 
(prices Si. 50, Si. 00 and .50) may be procured by mail of Mrs. 
Permar, S.^o Beacon street, telephone, Back Bay 1661-9-.- All 
seats are reserved. 

The first of the plays is a society comedy by Julian Sturgis 
entitled "Picking up the Pieces." It will be staged by Miss 
Ruth Delano, who will also portray the leading character. The 
second play, " Monseigneur, an Interlude," by Miss Constance 
d'Arcy Mackay, is a moment of the intense life of Paris, just 
after the fall of the Bastile. The third play, never before pre- 
sented in America, is one of the famous "Celtic renaissance" 
group, written for the Irish National Theater. It is called " The 
Poorhouse" and is by Douglas Hyde — a quaint bit of genre life. 



ALUMN/E NOTES. 

It, will be of interest to Wellesley graduates who are interested 
in Art to learn that, at the recent December meeting of the 
Archaeological Institute of America, the Study of Mediaeval and 
Renaissance Art has been at last recognized by that important 
association by the establishment of a fellowship in the Fine Arts 
of six hundred dollars a year, in the same general conditions as 
those fixed for the fellowships in Classical Studies. It was 
also voted to'allow lectures in these subjects to be given at the 
School for Classical Studies in Rome. A committee of the 
Institute is now arranging for the publication of the conditions 
of the fellowship, the examinations for which will tend to set 
the standard for Art Study in all American Colleges. 
"The following notice which appeared in Charities, October 
1, IQ04, will be of interest to Alumn?e who are engaged in social 
and charity work : 

Anticipating a demand for more careful study and training 
for the employees of societies and institutions as one result of 
the recent establishing of three professional schools for social 
and charity workers, Charities has prepared to render its 
readers a practical service through its Employment Exchange. 
Close relations on the one hand with managing officers, and on 
the other with Dr. Edward T. Devine of the New York School, 
Dr. Jeffrey R. Brackett of the Boston School, and Prof. Graham i 
Taylor of the Chicago School, place Charities in an exceptional 1 
position to know the needs of both organizations and workers, 
and to help adjust them. 

To this end the Employment Exchange has been placed in 
the hands of Miss Helen M. Kelsey, formerly registrar of Welles- 
lev College, who will give to it personal attention and the effective 
methods of a well-organized employment bureau. The adver- 
tising columns of Charities will be used at Miss Kelsey's dis- 
cretion. A nominal registration fee will be charged applicants 
to cover clerical expenses, and further business arrangements 
will be upon a liberal basis. No charge is made those in search 
of workers. 

The Colorado Wellesley Club held its annual Holiday Lunch- 
eon, Friday, December, 30th, at one o'clock. Covers were laid 
for thirty-six, among the number being several mothers and 
sisters of the members. The decorations consisted of the Col- 
lege color, pennants, ferns and tiny flags, souvenirs of the oc- 
casion. The place cards were Delft scenes on postals sent to 



the: musician 

EDITED BY THOMAS TA P P E R. 

A monthly journal devoted to the educational interests of music 

Price 15c per copy, $1.50 per year. 

Agent wanted to take subscriptions at Wellesley Colle ge. 
Liberal Commissions allowed. 
Write for particulars. 

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Telephone 113- Wellesley. 

" Hey, there : 

Where you going? " "Down to 
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H. H. PORTER, 

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F. A. Coolidge & Co., 

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Washington St., Wellesley. 



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COLLEGE NEWS 



ALUMN/E NOTES— Continued. 

the Club by Miss Mary Oliphant, 1900, during her trip in Hol- 
land. The' programs were rolled up like diplomas and tied with 
Wellesley blue baby-ribbon, each headed with an appropriate 
illustration from the Legendas. The toast -mistress was Miss 
Helen Harrington; chairman of Committee of Arrangements, 
Miss Madeleine Steele; of Program Committee, Miss Fannie 
Field, '04. The program was an especially clever and inter- 
esting one, the speakers being, Miss Mary Oliphant, 1900, Miss 
Madeleine Steele, 1904, Mrs. Mira Camp Bostwick, 1887-1888, 
Miss Helen Atkins, 1897, an< i ^ rs - Brinkerhoff. 

Miss Margaret E. Stratton, formerly professor of Rhetoric 
and for several years Dean of the College sailed last June for 
England with some Colorado friends. She spent the fall in 
Dresden and is now in Rome for the winter. The apartment 
which they have taken is 68 Capo le Case. 

Miss Mary Brigham Hill, 1S93, wuTT5e in Redlands, California, 
after January first. Miss Hill has been making some visits in 
the east, and was present at the Yeat's Plays given in the Barn 
in November when Miss Caroline Newman, 1893, appeared in 
several parts. 

Mrs. Mary Cushing Shatswell, 1S93, has been elected pres- 
ident of the Dedham Woman's Club. 

Miss Mabel W. Learoyd, 1894, has accepted the Principalship 
of the Northfield Bible Training School, which fits young women 
for all forms of Christian work open to women. After gradua- 
tion Miss Learoyd taught one year in Simsbury, Conn., and for 
the past nine years, with the exception of one year, has taught 
at the Mount Hermon School. During this year she was Secre- 
tary of the Harlem Y. W. C. A. So she comes to her new work 
specially fitted by training and experience. 

Miss Eliza A. Bateman, 1894, is spending the winter in New- 
port, .Massachusetts. Her address is 101 Vernon street. 

Miss Ada M. Belfield, 1896, sailed from New York, January 
-fourteenth with her father and mother, to be gone until next 
September. They will visit Spain, Italy and Greece in suc- 
cession and then go back across the continent. 

Miss Charlotte Burnett, 1896, is playing Viola this winter 
under the management of Mr. Joseph Shipman. The company 
has been travelling in the South and West and played during the 
Christmas holidays at Paris, Texas. Miss Burnett and the 
company supporting her are receiving a very warm welcome 
and most favorable criticisms from the Texas newspapers. 

Miss Emily Baxter, 1897, is on the Executive Committee of 
the College Settlement in Portland, Maine. For several years 
Miss Baxter w-as Head Worker but there is now a resident Head 
Worke r. 

Miss Gertrude Sanborn. 189S, is superintendent of the Cafe- 
teria on Bedford street in Boston. She is living at West Newton. 

Miss Elizabeth McCaulley, formerly of 1901, spent the Christ- 
mas holidays in New Orleans and is visiting Miss Mary Tenkins, 
1903, on her wav home. 

Miss May Mathews and Miss Caroline Pitkin, both of 1902, 
are hoVle-s of scholarships offered by Greenwich House and 
Hartley House for the purnose of training young women in gen- 
eral settlement work. Miss Mathews is at present acting as 
head worker while Miss Green is away on several months' leave 
of absence. 

Miss Elizabeth Lennox, 1902, is at work on a special line of 
investigation relating to the standard of living of the people in 
the Greenwich House district. This work is under the direction 
of the Greenwich House Committee on Social Investigation, 
composed of a professor of Columbia Lmiversity. Mr. Devine of 
the Charity Organization Society and Dr. Semkhovitch. A 
special fund is raised for this work by the Committee. 

Miss Grace Newhart, 1903, spent the last summer abroad. 

Miss Kate Lord, 1903. is at home this winter studving Chem- 
istry. ^She spent part of last summer at Woods Hole" Massachu- 
setts" ' 

ENGAGEMENTS ANNOUNCED. 

Miss Leila B. Nye, formerly of 1893. to Mr. Auguste Albert of 
Boston, formerly of Switzerland. 

MARRIAGFS. 

Gnade — Fleming. At Oil City, Pennsylvania, November 
23, 1004. Miss Maude Rav Fleming, 1902, to Mr. Edward Rich- 
ard Guade. At home after January fifteenth at 211 Lincoln 
street, Oil City. 

Cooke — Edoeri.v. At Somerville, Massachusetts, Novem- 
ber 30, 1004. Miss Harrie Gertrude Edgerly, 1890-1892, to Mr. 
Charles Prentiss Cooke of Los Angeles, California. 

BIRTHS. 

In New York City, December 24, 1904, a son, Rolof Beuckert 
Stanley, Jr., to Mrs. Alice Knox Stanley, 1900. 

At Sycamore, Illinois, September 13, 1904, a son to Mrs. 
Jane Bvers Faissler, 1896. 

At West Newton, Massachusetts, October 7, 1904, a son, 
Holland Chipman, to Mrs. Ina Chipman Smith, 1896. 



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Hotels, Steamships, Restaurants and 
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Faneuil Hall Market, Boston 

CONNECTED BY TELEPHONE. 




COLLEGE NEWS 



SOCIETY NOTES. 

At the regular meeting of the Shakespeare Society held on 
Saturday evening, December 17, the following program was 
presented: 

Shakespeare News ■ Caroline Gilbert 

The Sources of the " Tempest" Olive Hunter 

Critical Estimates of the "Tempest" Helen Cook 

Much Ado About Nothing. 
Act II. Scene 3. 

Benedick ■ Dorothy Storey 

Don Pedro Ida Ellison 

Leonato Helen Norton 

Claudio Bonnie Hunter 

Balthasar Louise Loos 

Bay Emma Miller 

Beatrice Laura Dwight 

Act IV. Scene 2. 

Dogberry Jessie Hall 

Verges ■ Connie Guion 

Sexton Edith Ellison 

Conrade Sybil Burton 

Borachio Caroline Gilbert 

Watch Louise Steele 

The Tempest. 
Act I. Scene 2. 

Prospero Olive Smith 

Miranda Madeline Hanson 

Ferdinand Louise Garford 

Ariel Katrina Ware 

Caliban Sarah Woodward 

The Alumnae and former members present were: Miss Tufts, 
'84;. Miss Jewett, Miss Gamble, '89; Miss McDonald, '88; Miss 
Hardee, '94; Miss Skinner, '99; Miss Stockwell, '03; Miss 
Klingenhagen. '02; Miss Slack, '02; Miss Foster, '03; Miss 
Arnold, '04. 

A meeting of Society Zeta Alpha was held in the Society House 
on Saturday evening, December 17, 1904. 

The following program was given, selections from the second 
part of the mask of " The Dead Florentines. " 

Chorus Sally Reed 

Herald Alice Carroll 

Lorenzo di Medici Mary Alexander 

Leonardo da Vinci Jane Eaton 

Fra Lippo Lippi Myra Foster 

Giovanni di Pico Mary Ball 

Simonetta Netta Wanamaker 

Attendants Genevieve Wheeler. Mae Osborn 

Poliziano Mary McDougall 

Florence of to-day Miss Martha Shackford, '97 

The Alumna? present were Miss Shackford,'97; Miss Cook, '99; 
and Miss Hyde, formerly of '04. 

At a meeting of the Agora held on December the seventeenth, 
the following program was given. 

Impromptu Speeches: 

1. The tenor of the President's Message, 

Agnes Wood, Nina Gage, Georgia Harrison 

2. The Agreement of the United States with Panama, 

Harriet Foss 
The regular program for the evening was a discussion in the 
Senate, of the bill for the protection of the President. The sena- 
tors who took part in the debate were : Senator from South Car- 
olina, Marian Bruner; Senator from Georgia, Marjorie Dietz; 
Senator from Michigan, Josephine Dibble; Senator from New 
Jersey, Georgia Harrison. 

THEATER NOTES. 

Hollis-street Theater — John Drew in " The Duke of Killi- 

crankie. " 
Colonial Theater — Lulu Glaser in "A Madcap Princess." 
Boston Theater — " The Two Orphans." 

Majestic Theater — Wright Lorimer in "The Shepherd King." 
Tremont Theater — "James K. Hackett in " The Fortunes of 

the King." 
Castle Square Theater — "The Shaughraun." 

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Direct attention to an advanced collection of 

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Comprising the latest importations 
of Messaline Silks with guimpe set, 
and a complete assortment of hand 
embroidered Lawn, Batiste, Hand- 
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exquisite Muslin and Jap Silk lin- 
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Reduction Sale at The Wellesley Inn. 

Rosetti Prints from Mausell's, London. 

Reduction of 20 per cent, and 25 per cent, from 
prices before quoted, on all pictures remaining from 
the Christmas Sale. 

A New Assortment will be exhibited to-day — 
Wednesday.